Queen Margrethe in Wittenberg

Queen Margrethe joined German President Joachim Gauck in Wittenberg yesterday for the reopening ceremony of the All Saints’ Church. For this event, she repeated her mint green hat with cuff brim.

    

This remains a great design for Margrethe and the photo above shows, more clearly than we have seen before, the same silk crepe fabric on both the hat and suit. This makes for a very ‘matchy’ ensemble- something she seems to favour. This event also unveiled the altar cloth Queen Margrethe designed and hand embroidered as gift for this occasion- it’s certainly a work of art.
Photos from Getty as indicated

16 thoughts on “Queen Margrethe in Wittenberg

  1. What an interesting monarch is Margrethe!
    The suit is just flattering enough in design, but it’s disappointing to see a mint colour that is too cool for her warm complexion, when there are (as always) so many options to choose from.
    I dislike nearly all Margrethe’s hats with a rounded crown – I find these crowns unflattering to her angular face shape, which is fabulously offset with an angled crown.

  2. I really like this mint green outfit, it suits her very well.
    The idea that a Queen embroided an altar cloth herself is unheard of, to begin with, but the result is really amazing. I am full of admiration for her work. This piece is priceless and historical I think. I hope it will be taken care of for decades.

    • I doubt she actually did all of that needlework herself thats months of work. When would she have had the time? Its her design and possibly some of her stitching but she had to have had others working on such a piece. Im not a huge fan of the flames at the sides or the depth on the petals, HMs modernist style isn’t quite my cup of tea

      • In an article posted by HatQueen over the weekend, it said she had been working on it for over a year. Margrethe is known for her artwork in a variety of media.

      • She made the entire thing- embroidery is a great hobby of hers. In the interview I shard, she said she worked on it almost every afternoon for several months.

        But of course, you can doubt whatever you want.

  3. Still one of my favorite hats for Margrethe. And it’s nice to see recognition for her artwork as well; too often I think the spotlight is on the royals and athletics, and not so much on the royals and more artistic pursuits.

  4. This is one of my favourite looks for the Queen. The hat and suit are so smart together.
    Following the fascinating interview you posted on the weekend, Hat Queen, I was anxious to see the altar piece. It is so lovely. I’d love to see a close-up of the actual embroidery. The centre cross looks couched and quilted. Margrethe is certainly multi-talented.

    • Just had a closer look at the altar piece. It’s needlepoint, I think. Her shading is so clever that it gives the impression of dimension.

  5. I have also made several (Anglican) altar frontals and super frontals, as well as chasubles, stoles and other liturgical embroideries and vestments. It is so interesting to see the Queen’s original works. I have seen some quilted hangings of hers before, so this is a change of pace. Considering her immense artistic takent, I am always surprised at the “matchiness” of her ensemble, and, I admit, slightly disappointed that her clothes don’t reflect this artistry. The Prince Consort seems to have a lot more fun with his clothing.

  6. The queen looks lovely–lovely suit, beautifully matched with the flattering hat. (How beautifully she embroidered the altar cloth–as a queen of medieval days might have done. A very talented lady.)

  7. HM looks lovely, as always – mint green is a very nice color.
    Now to the altar cloth – WOW! Magnificent colors and workmanship for such a beautiful church!

    • This is one of her best hats, and I’m always glad to see it even though the color reads spring to me. What a beautiful altar cloth! Thanks to HatQueen for for providing background by posting a link to the interview a few days ago.

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