Closer Look at Three New Designs

Three hats came up in discussion in Saturday’s ‘extras’ post that I think warrant greater coverage and discussion here on Royal Hats. So here we go!

Last Thursday, February 1, Princess Margriet attended a ceremony at the Flood Museum in Ouwerkerk to commemorate the 65th anniversary of the 1953 flood caused by a storm tide across the northwest European shelf that caused massive flooding in the Netherlands and claimed 1836 Dutch lives. For this national commemoration, Margriet wore a navy blue felt trilby style hat with extended brim. Lengthening a trilby brim doesn’t always work but this one hits the mark and looks wonderfully stylish on Princess Margriet.

Embed from Getty Images

Designer: unknown
Previously Worn: I believe this hat is new

Last Friday, February 2, Princess Ayako of Takamado and Princess Nobuko of Mikasa attended the 67th Kanto Tokai Flower Exhibition in Tokyo, both in black hats. Princess Ayako’s rounded crown design features a mushroom brim and unique flat fan bow bow on the side of the crown. Princess Nobuko’s brimess hat follows an asymetrical shape emphasized by wide velvet binding on the top and bottom, and is simply trimmed with a bow at the back. It’s a much bolder shape than we’re used to seeing on Imperial royal hats but one that Nobuko carries so well.

Feb 2, 2018 | Royal Hats

Feb 2, 2018 | Royal Hats

Designer: both are
Previously Worn: I believe both hats are new

I think all three hats are a great example of style by shape- no exuberant trims are needed to make them stand out (perhaps, except Princess Ayako’s hat, which would look amazing with a large Lady Amherst feather wrapped around the brim!). I’m curious to hear what you think. 
Photos from Getty as indicated; Sankei
Advertisements

Princess Margriet Visits Canada

Princess Margriet and Peter von Vollenhoven are on a visit to Canada this week. Yesterday, for the couple’s meeting with veterans at the Royal Botanical Gardens in Burlington, Princess Margriet repeated a white feather pouf fascinator.

While the choice of a white headpiece for her red suit is a lovely tribute to her Canadian hosts, It feels to me that Margriet’s head and body are going to two separate events.

Designer: unknown
Previously Worn: April 30, 2011
I can’t think of an example when a royal hat truly looked great with a pair of trousers (top hats and morning suits excepted, of course!)- can you?
Photos from Getty as indicated

Dutch Royals Commemorate National Remembrance

King Willem Alexander and Queen Máxima took part in the National Remembrance ceremony held at the National Monument on Dam Square in Amsterdam today. Queen Máxima repeated her black felt rounded pillbox hat with flat bow at the back.

Embed from Getty Images

Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images

Designer: Fabienne Delvigne
Previously Worn: March 21, 2017December 17, 2015May 4, 2015November 10, 2014; November 2, 2013

Princess Margriet, Pieter van Vollenhoven and Prince Pieter-Christiaan attended a similar ceremony at the Military War Cemetery Grebbeberg near Rhenen.  Princess Margriet repeated her wide brimmed black straw hat trimmed with a simple black hatband and what looks to be large, almost abstract straw leaves on the side. The hat has undergone a renovation since its first outing, when the trim also included black feathers.

Designer: unknown
Previously Worn: November 10, 2014
Photos from Getty as indicated

This Week’s Extras

Royal Hats

Princess Eugenie joined her grandparents for church last Sunday in a bright pink Juliette Botterill hat. The Queen repeated a Rachel Trevor Morgan design (Daily Mail)

Prince Haakon in knit caps and hairnets during a visit to Stranda this week (Royal House of Norway)

Take a second look at this post of the Imperial royals for some additional photos, including the most chic winter white fedora I think I’ve ever seen (Royal Hats)

Back on January 12, Princess Margriet wore a grey faux fur hat to the annual new year reception at the Royal Palace. You can see a back view of the white-domed piece here.

Princess Margriet, January 12, 2016 | Royal Hats     Princess Margriet, January 12, 2016 | Royal Hats

Royal Hats
Monaco’s prince and princess paid annual tribute to their patron Saint Devote (Daily Mail)

Hats From the Past

Royal Hats to Prinsjesdag in 1962. Queen Juliana (middle) delivered the speech from the throne and was joined on the balcony by husband Princer Bernhard and daughters Princess Beatrix, Princess Irene and Princess Margriet. Their hats are such classic pieces from the time, aren’t they?!

Photo from Getty as indicated

Orange-Nassau Wedding, Ten Years On: The Guests

Royal Hats After looking at the marvellous hats worn at Prince Pieter-Christiaan and Princess Anita’s civil wedding ten years ago, it is now time to look at the hats worn by guests at their religious ceremony.

The groom’s mother, Princess Margriet, topped her two toned pink suit with a magenta straw hat with a wide, upfolded brim. The hat appeared to have a double crown, thanks to a tall wrap of straw around the rounded crown, and the piece was trimmed with pink and red feathers on the side.

Anita’s mother, J.C.M. van Eijk-Steens, topped her ice blue suit with a straw hat in the same hue. This piece had a double brim made of translucent straw and was trimmed with straw rosettes, training bow tails, and pale blue feathers. While there is much going on with the hat, it was well balanced with her more streamlined suit.

 Prince Pieter-Christiaan of Orange-Nassau and Anita Van Eijk, August 27, 2005 | Royal Hats

Princess Marilène topped her gunmetal grey and aubergine ensemble with a navy straw hat. Trimmed with a large purple flower on the side (see it here), the simple straw piece swept off her face in a gently upfolded brim. It’s a fairly nondescript hat that seemed slightly at odds with the rest of her more fashion-forward outfit.

Princess Marilène, August 27, 2005 | Royal Hats

Princess Annette repeated the same cream straw hat she wore two days earlier to the civil wedding, replacing the black ribbon around the crown with a slim one in palest blue. I suppose it’s hardly a surprising move for a princess who has very few public engagements (and ever fewer which require a hat) to recycle a neutral piece in this kind of way.

Aimée Söhngen, who would marry the Princess Margriet’s youngest son two months later, wore a bright pink short Fez style hat wrapped in a large veil of dotted pink net. Clearly designed to coordinate with her pink dotted jacket and shoes, the hat seemed off balance and oddly squashed around the middle. Unfortunately, the piece was left looking like a 1960s lampshade.

Aimée Söhngen, August 27, 2005 | Royal Hats

Queen Beatrix (as she was then) topped her grey dress with a coordinating straw hat. The flat brimmed piece featured a wide straw wrap around the flat crown; from the front, the hat was streamlined and restrained. In contrast, the back of the brim raised slightly to reveal a mass of pink and silver blooms that nestled into the Queen’s hair. I adore this surprise around the back of the hat; the hidden blooms are reminiscent of the hat Beatrix wore to Princess Amalia’s christening which makes me guess that this piece is another design by Emmy Hill.

Queen Beatrix, August 27, 2005 | Royal Hats

Princess Máxima (as was her title in 2005) wore one of her most memorable hats to this event. Made of stripes of transparent magenta and red straw, the wide brim of the picture hat was formed into large fluted ruffles that gave the Fabienne Delvigne design an incredible sense of movement and presence. On it’s own, the hat was a creative masterpiece but its pairing with Máxima’s shiny red coat and huge costume earrings took the ensemble way over the top. Máxima has not repeated this hat to date and I would love to see it make another outing with a more simple, neutral dress. As far as millinery goes, it is spectacular.

While I would love to see Máxima’s hat repeated, I’m pleased that Princess Laurentien’s hat has been left in the past. The Marianne Jongkind design, made of gold straw, featured a soaring, pointy crown and brim, each edged in brown straw. While the shape was unique, it overwhelmed the princess and looked like it was headed to a costume party instead of a royal wedding. Its pairing with her fussy brown dress and cartoonish belt seems like an experiment in avant garde fashion that went very wrong.

The daughters of Princess Irene (who was lecturing in South Africa and did not attend), Princess Carolina and Princess Margarita, wore much more demure pieces. Carolina topped her lilac printed jacket with a chic lavender hat with asymetrically raised brim; Margarita matched her dark raspberry straw hat to her skirt. While she did not wear a hat, Princess Mabel’s fashion choice had a very sentimental note- she  wore the same dress Princess Beatrix wore for her engagement announcement in 1965.

Princess Carolina, August 27, 2005 | Royal Hats

Princess Christina wore an orange and coral feathered fascinator and her daughter, Juliana Guillermo, wore a headpiece of trailing copper feathers. While neither piece are particularly memorable, I adore that two family members chose hues of orange for this Orange-Nassau wedding.

The only guest from a foreign royal family was Princess Astrid of Belgium, who wore a sleek silver picture hat with cartwheel brim trimmed with a silk ribbon around the base of the crown. The austere hat combined beautifully with her textured Chanel suit, leaving no question that the ensemble was haute couture from head to toe.

The hats at this wedding covered the full spectrum from elegant to eccentric, exquisite to egregious. Keeping their age in mind, dear readers, I’m curious to hear which hats made the strongest style statement for you?

Photos from ANP; Michel Porro via Getty; and Getty as indicated

Dutch Royals Celebrate Tenth Anniversary

Royal Hats Prince Pieter-Christiaan and Princess Anita of Orange-Nassau are celebrating their tenth wedding anniversary this week. In honour of this milestone, we’re going to take a look back this week at the many hats worn at their civil and religious weddings.

Prince Pieter-Christiaan, third son of Princess Margriet of the Netherlands and her husband, Professor Pieter van Vollenhoven, met Anita van Eijk when they were both working in London, sometime between 2000 and 2003. Their civil wedding, on August 25, 2005, took place at Het Loo Palace in Apeldoorn (the Prince was raised on a nearby estate) attended by family and friends. Following the trend set by other von Vollenhoven daughter-in-laws, Anita wore a brightly coloured Andrew Gn suit for the civil ceremony.

Printed with coral and trimmed with chunky beads at the collar and cuffs, the green and yellow  ensemble was topped with a large headpiece in the same shades. Made up of splayed straw leaves around a central mass of yellow ranunculus blooms, I remain perplexed about how Anita’s garden headpiece related to the deep-sea theme of her suit.

Prince Pieter-Christiaan and Anita van Eijk, August 25, 2005 | Royal Hats

The groom’s mother, Princess Margriet, topped her black and white suit with a coordinating pompom fascinator. Princess Marilène, wife of Prince Maurits, wore an avant garde hat with a stacked gold straw crown and transparent cream brim, attached most unusually at the top of the crown. With her gold bubble skirt, the ensemble had a decidedly futuristic, outer space vibe about it.

Princess Annette and Aimée Söhngen (Prince Floris’ fiancée who would join the Dutch royal family just two months later) both wore black and white ensembles topped with coordinating cartwheel brimmed hats. Aimée’s hat, with its black straw crown and white lattice brim, added a particularly lovely top note to her elegant ensemble.

At the time of this wedding, I wondered if the black/white/gold ensembles worn by Princess Margriet and her daughters-in-law were deliberately chosen to let the bride stand out. If this was indeed the case, it did not apply to Queen Beatrix (as was her title then), who topped her cornflower blue dress with a tall crowned hat in silver straw.

The loudest style statement at these civil nuptials was made by Princess Laurentien, who wore a vibrant turquoise and lime trouser suit. The oufit’s pairing with a coordinating turquoise gigantic, flat crowned picture hat by Fabienne Delvigne simply defies description.

While some of these Dutch royal hats make rather bold statements, I think overall, they have aged surprisingly well in ten years of changing fashion (much better than the outfits they were paired with!) and with some new frocks, could be successfully repeated today. I’m curious which pieces stand out to you most, dear readers, and for what reasons.

On Thursday, we’ll look at the hats worn at Prince Pieter-Christiaan and Princess Anita’s religious wedding which took place on August 27, 2005. You’re in for some real corkers.

Photos from ANP and Getty as indicated